Dumbtown Brewing Company

Stupid Good Beers

Tag: Altruism

2. Altruistic Amber

Japanese Macaques

I joke with bar owners and managers that if they so desire I can de-optimize their tap revenue. That’s what trying to brew 64 different styles in equal proportion would do. As a practical numbers person, I do understand that you have to give the people what they want.

A top-notch amber would be a huge part of making Dumbtown work as a business.

I know the Dumbtown ask is no small thing. I get that. A home brewer isn’t just giving up a substantial amount of time. Brewers are also (to a limited extent) giving up their beers.

The Dumbtown proposition is clearly a huge ask.

  • Style: Amber
  • Liner note: The intent is 64 styles of beer during the entire calendar year, not all at once. That would be crazy. I’m thinking more like some undefined number between 24 and 25 taps – whatever it takes.
  • Beer tangent: Il Dorke wants to break the locks with beer.

3. Coin in the Fountain

PozibleFundingFail

http://www.pozible.com/project/179057

I have never been able to effectively articulate my notion of someone dropping a coin in fountain vis-à-vis my Evans School Notions. It has always stymied me. I have always over talked it. So I’ll try to keep it short.

There are many magnificent things about the craft beer movement. A deeply ingrained belief that an enterprise must find ways to give back to the community is perhaps the most magnificent. I want Dumbtown Brewing Company to give back but the coin in the fountain idea extends to the entire school and beyond.

I want to give the people who come to Dumbtown a chance to drop a tiny coin in the public fountain. They’ll do it as customers when they buy Dumbtown’s beers but I dream of taproom where visitors have the ability to do a little something more. I dream of citizens coming to the Evans School specifically because they want to create some social lagniappe while at that old school.

What does that look like? I don’t know.

Perhaps three patrons come up with a hilarious way to teach the Pythagorean Theorem. So they head off to the auditorium or some other space in the school and film it. The workings of this comedic triad gets posted to the Evans School website. Just one child views their effort but it makes a difference.

I want to push in a direction that says that was a magnificent night out. I want nano positives to be properly accounted for.

  • Style: Copper
  • Liner note: Dumbtown needs a solid stable of broadly appealing and sessionable beers. And like the Altruistic Amber, a spectacular copper fits that bill.
  • Beer tangent: It’s a race to see who can coin whose fountain first.

7. I Need A Beeracle

City and Country Building in Denver Colorado Christmas

Dumbtown is a problem filled idea. You want to compete in Denver’s craft beer market? Gee, that’s smart. How about quality control? It’s like I’ve constructed Dumbtown to maximize the opportunities for failure.

Hence, I Need a Beeracle.

This will be Dumbtown’s Parade of Lights Beer.

8. Clarence’s Wings

Clarences Wings

Yes, it is a reference to It’s a Wonderful Life. It’s the first of many. Confessed Capra zealot you got here. What’s the better movie Citizen Kane or It’s a Wonderful life? Personally, I’ll take the later. I’ll take all the George Baileys I can get.

Maybe one day Dumbtown can do spirits and serve the kinds of drinks Clarence tried to order but until then Dumbtown is just looking for a great beer that’s a little nuts.

  • Style: Coconut Porter
  • Liner note: Dumbtown has to give back (i.e., contribute to society) from day one. Dumbtown has to put its coin in the fountain everyday it’s open. Here, I would like to keep it simple – at least at first. I’d like to know that every time a beer sells Denver Public Schools get a dime. My wife says, “that should rhyme”, AS IF to imply I could do better. At this stage, my reaction is, perhaps, AND debt done dime doubles.
    How does that dime or it’s double get delivered? I do not know. I’d like to hear what the 64 Ronin think about this.
  • Beer tangent: Bury the business plan backwards